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      • An examination of the relationship between perceived disaster-related stress, family protective factors, and children's positive and negative adjustment after wildfire exposure

An examination of the relationship between perceived disaster-related stress, family protective factors, and children's positive and negative adjustment after wildfire exposure

Author:
Sprague, Caryll M.
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Counseling, Clinical & School Psychology
Degree Supervisor:
Maryam Kia-Keating
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2014
Issued Date:
2014
Topics:
Psychology, Clinical
Keywords:
Social Support
Protective Factors
Wildfire
Disaster
Children
Parents
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2014
Description:

Although family-level factors have been identified as important predictors of child functioning in the aftermath of disaster, the relationship between family risk and protective factors and child adjustment in the context of disaster remains unclear (Weems & Overstreet, 2008; Norris, Friedman, Watson, Byrne, Diaz & Kaniasty, 2002; Gewirtz, Forgatch & Weiling, 2008). In addition, the majority of research on child functioning in the aftermath of disasters investigates the impact of various family-level factors on negative child outcomes and tends to ignore investigation of positive adjustment or factors that lead to resilience in the context of disaster (Kilmer & Gil-Rivas, 2010). In order to address the present gaps in the field, this project used data from both children and parents to investigate and clarify the relationship between perceived disaster-related stress, family-level protective factors and children's negative and positive adjustment following three devastating wildfires that occurred in Santa Barbara County in 2008-2009. Participants included 50 families who were living in homes that were damaged or destroyed by the fires or were forced to evacuate. Results indicated that child gender and children's perceived social support were significant predictors of children's emotional symptoms as reported by children, but not as reported by parents. In addition, findings suggested that children's perceived social support served as a moderator of the relationship between perceived fire-related stress and children's prosocial behaviors, as reported by parents. Clinical and research implications of these findings are discussed.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (140 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3xs5sjp
ISBN:
9781321350203
Catalog System Number:
990045117700203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Caryll Sprague
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