Alexandria Digital Research Library

Self-Formulations of Embodied Action in Naturally Occurring Interaction

Author:
Royce, Tracy
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Sociology
Degree Supervisor:
Geoffrey Raymond
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2013
Issued Date:
2013
Topics:
Psychology, Behavioral, Sociology, Sociolinguistics, and Speech Communication
Keywords:
Self-formulation
Embodied behavior
Formulation
Conversation analysis
Embodiment
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
M.A.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2013
Description:

As conversation analysts have shown, participants can achieve a variety of social actions via talk alone (as with telephone conversations), or alternately via embodied behavior in the absence of talk. In some instances, however, people use talk in conjunction with embodied behavior, articulating precisely what it is they are doing (or alternately, what they would like recipients to believe they are doing). Drawing upon digital videos from the University of California, Santa Barbara's vast collection of naturally occurring interactions, cases in which the aforementioned practice occurs were identified, collected, and analyzed using the established methods of conversation analysis. Self-formulations of embodied actions were found in one of three sequential positions relative to the actions they explicate: before the commission of an action, after its completion or abandonment, or while an action was still underway. Generally, self-formulations either serve as a prophylactic against potential trouble or in response to trouble that has actually transpired. Self-formulations provide recipients with an "official account" of what a person is about to do, has done (or tried to do), or is involved with doing. In formulating their actions, participants show themselves to be oriented not only to possible interactional troubles, but also to the fact that recipients routinely monitor others' in-progress actions, drawing inferences about their import.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (58 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3xd0zrr
ISBN:
9781303540424
Catalog System Number:
990040925240203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Tracy Royce
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