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      • Designing and testing a classroom curriculum to teach preschoolers about the biology of physical activity : the respiration system as an underlying biological causal mechanism

Designing and testing a classroom curriculum to teach preschoolers about the biology of physical activity : the respiration system as an underlying biological causal mechanism

Author:
Ewing, Tracy S.
Degree Supervisor:
Laura Romo and Yukari Okamoto
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2016
Issued Date:
2016
Topics:
Science education, Early childhood education, and Physical education
Genres:
Online resources and Dissertations, Academic
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Education
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2016
Description:

The present study examined young children's understanding of respiration and oxygen as a source of vital energy underlying physical activity. Specifically, the purpose of the study was to explore whether a coherent biological theory, characterized by an understanding that bodily parts (heart and lungs) and processes (oxygen in respiration) as part of a biological system, can be taught as a foundational concept to reason about physical activity. The effects of a biology-based intervention curriculum designed to teach preschool children about bodily functions as a part of the respiratory system, the role of oxygen as a vital substance and how physical activity acts an energy source were examined. Participants were recruited from three private preschool classrooms (two treatment; 1 control) in Southern California and included a total of 48 four-year-old children (30 treatment; 18 control).

Findings from this study suggested that young children could be taught relevant biological concepts about the role of oxygen in respiratory processes. Children who received biology-based intervention curriculum made significant gains in their understanding of the biology of respiration, identification of physical and sedentary activities. In addition these children demonstrated that coherence of conceptual knowledge was correlated with improved accuracy at activity identification and reasoning about the inner workings of the body contributing to endurance. Findings from this study provided evidence to support the benefits of providing age appropriate but complex coherent biological instruction to children in early childhood settings.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (120 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3v124zv
ISBN:
9781369340488
Catalog System Number:
990047189320203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Tracy Ewing
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