Alexandria Digital Research Library

The role of feedback contingency in perceptual category learning : an investigation of neurobiological and behavioral mechanisms

Author:
Vucovich, Lauren Elizabeth
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Psychology
Degree Supervisor:
F. Gregory Ashby
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2016
Issued Date:
2016
Topics:
Quantitative psychology, Cognitive psychology, and Neurosciences
Keywords:
Feedback Contingency
Categorization
Learning
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2016
Description:

Feedback is highly contingent on behavior if it eventually becomes easy to predict, and weakly contingent on behavior if it remains difficult or impossible to predict even after learning is complete. Many studies have demonstrated that humans and nonhuman animals are highly sensitive to feedback contingency, but no known studies have examined how feedback contingency affects category learning, and current theories assign little or no importance to this variable. The following dissertation examined the effects of contingency degradation on rule-based and information-integration category learning. In addition to behavioral effects, these experiments constitute an initial investigation into the prefrontal cortex and the striatum as potential neurobiological mechanisms responsible for contingency detection or computation. Ultimately, learning was good in high-contingency conditions, but most participants showed little or no evidence of learning in low-contingency conditions. Possible causes of these effects are discussed, as well as their theoretical and neurobiological implications.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (134 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3t153s1
ISBN:
9781369340594
Catalog System Number:
990047190140203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Lauren Vucovich
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