Alexandria Digital Research Library

'Success is Surviving': Poverty, Culture, and Urban Project Survival

Author:
Sarabia, Rachel Renee
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Sociology
Degree Supervisor:
Victor M. Rios and Denise A. Segura
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2013
Issued Date:
2013
Topics:
Hispanic American Studies, Sociology, Criminology and Penology, Sociology, Public and Social Welfare, and Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies
Keywords:
Latina/os.
Violence
Culture
Class
Race
Poverty
And Gender
Criminalization
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2013
Description:

Few studies examine women and youths' experiences living in housing projects. Even fewer studies examine residents' various interlocking struggles or document their strategies for survival in these spaces. My dissertation examines how women and youth are not isolated from the social consequences of deindustrialization, the concentration of urban poverty, racial segregation, gangs, drugs, or violence that surround their community. I analyze how housing project residents utilize and generate culture to make sense of their daily lives; to negotiate project poverty, criminalization, and violence; and ultimately, to survive in their urban environment. In order to understand the processes and conditions of urban project survival, I combine the methods of critical criminology, poverty studies, and justice studies with urban ethnography. Over a two-year period (January 2009 -- June 2011), I employ multiple qualitative research methods including archival research, participant-observation, online networking, shadowing, conceptual community mapping, interviews, and focus groups. My analysis reveals the housing projects as a structurally disadvantaged, criminalized, and violent space, as well as a site of survival, consciousness, and resistance. It exposes poverty, criminalization, and violence as interactional processes that are simultaneously contested and reproduced in the housing projects. This research has potential for improving the lives of many residents and influencing effective policy.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (257 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3n014hf
ISBN:
9781303426926
Catalog System Number:
990040770890203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Rachel Sarabia
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