Alexandria Digital Research Library

Patterns of Brain Activity Associated with Successful Retrieval of Memories of Perceived and Imagined Events

Author:
King, Danielle R.
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Psychology
Degree Supervisor:
Michael B. Miller
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2013
Issued Date:
2013
Topics:
Psychology, General and Psychology, Cognitive
Keywords:
Source memory
Successful retrieval
Reality monitoring
Parietal
Imagery
Memory
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2013
Description:

Memories of internally generated events (e.g., thoughts, dreams, imaginations) are encoded, stored, and retrieved similarly to memories of real events. In the present set of experiments, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine whether brain regions known to support episodic memory processes are differentially activated during retrieval of memories that were acquired through perception versus imagination. In three experiments, subjects perceived and imagined events in response to a cue word, and then after a delay made memory judgments about previously perceived, imagined, and new events. Experiment 1 demonstrated that regions of the left lateral posterior parietal cortex (LPPC) were more active during retrieval of perceived compared to imagined events, regardless of memory accuracy. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated this effect, and also provided evidence that observed source-based differences in activity could not be attributed to differences in the perceptual vividness of memories from perception versus imagination. And Experiment 4 demonstrated that source-based differences in activity occurred regardless of differences in response bias. Each of these experiments also revealed that successful retrieval effects in LPPC were source-specific. Correct recognition of old events was associated with a greater LPPC response than correct rejection of new events for items that were perceived at encoding, but not for those that were imagined. Combined, these studies suggest that the LPPC plays a preferential role in the retrieval of memories of perceived compared to imagined events, and this does not appear to be due to discernable differences in task demands or behavioral performance. Implications of these findings for both theories of functional contributions of LPPC to recognition memory as well as the neural mechanisms underlying our ability to discriminate the perceived versus imagined source of memories are discussed.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (181 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3k64g5p
ISBN:
9781303539220
Catalog System Number:
990040924730203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Danielle King
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