Alexandria Digital Research Library

Corporal punishment and outcomes in Trinidadian youth : direct and indirect effects of parental warmth

Author:
Gopaul-Knights, Kezia K.
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Counseling, Clinical & School Psychology
Degree Supervisor:
Shane Jimerson
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2016
Issued Date:
2016
Topics:
Psychology, Individual & family studies, Social psychology, and Caribbean studies
Keywords:
Externalizing Behavior
Subjective Well-Being
Corporal Punishment
Parental Acceptance-Rejection
Cultural Normativeness
Bullying
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2016
Description:

There is an abundant amount of research examining the link between corporal punishment and youth outcomes in North America, Europe, and to a lesser extent in the Caribbean. However, there is little research examining this link within the Trinidadian setting. The current study addressed this gap within the literature by examining the association between corporal punishment and outcomes in Trinidadian youth. Specifically, this study investigated the relation between corporal punishment and subjective well-being and externalizing behaviors (bullying and delinquency). Additionally, it explored whether this relation was influenced by parental warmth or rejection and youth's cultural beliefs about corporal punishment. Results of structural equation modeling revealed that there was a direct link between corporal punishment and youth subjective well-being. Furthermore, it highlighted an indirect link between corporal punishment and subjective well-being through the mediator of parental warmth. Youths' cultural beliefs about corporal punishment were not a significant mediator in the model. These results were present when gender was used as a control. Additionally, multiple regression results indicated that corporal punishment was associated with both bullying and delinquency when parental warmth, youths' cultural beliefs about corporal punishment, and gender were used as controls. However, the effect sizes were small. The implications of the results of this study for childrearing and public policy are discussed.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (107 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3gx4bp2
ISBN:
9781369339581
Catalog System Number:
990047189370203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Kezia Gopaul-Knights
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