Alexandria Digital Research Library

How Migrant Parents in Beijing Care for Their Children : A Comparison Study on Parenting Strategies Between Poor and Not-so-poor Migrant Parents

Author:
Li, Qiao
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Global Studies
Degree Supervisor:
Richard P. Appelbaum
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2015
Issued Date:
2015
Topics:
Gender studies, Sociology, and Demography
Keywords:
Development
Family
China
Gender
Migration
Children
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
M.A.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2015
Description:

This paper seeks to contribute to the understanding of how internal migration in globalizing China shapes migrant parents' decision to raise their children. The case study focuses on how do poor and not-so-poor migrant parents care for their children both from afar and close by. The findings on which it is based come from three main sources. The first consisted of twenty semi-structured interviews with migrant parents and their now-adult children from different social-economic backgrounds in Beijing, China. The second source comes from participant observation at a migrant children's school in Beijing. The third source comes from archival research in California, where I gather the push-pull factors for migration within China, as well as the institutional barriers that prevents rural migrant parents and their children from utilizing social services in urban cities. Drawing from existing scholarship on China's globalizing economy, hukou reform, feminization of migration, and children of migration, I attempt to examine what does migrant family structures reveal about China's institutional discrimination? How do poor and not-so-poor migrant parents in Beijing care for their children? And how does migration effect now-adult children's outlook on life and work? By studying this topic, I hope to deepen the understanding of the social cost of migration on family relationships and children behind China's aggressive economic development. Moreover, this study aims to elevate the discussion of migrant families from the margins of scholarly research to a position of greater centrality.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (79 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3ff3qj9
ISBN:
9781339084466
Catalog System Number:
990045715860203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Qiao Li
File Description
Access: Public access
Li_ucsb_0035N_12602.pdf pdf (Portable Document Format)