Alexandria Digital Research Library

"Como es duro es bonito" Labor Conditions and Gendered Complexities for Women Working on a Fairtrade Rose Farm in Ecuador

Author:
Ellis, Corrie Jane
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Sociology
Degree Supervisor:
Kum-Kum Bhavnani
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2013
Issued Date:
2013
Topics:
Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies
Keywords:
Development
Labor
Ecuador
Women
Cut-flowers
Fairtrade
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
M.A.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2013
Description:

This study explores women's work in Ecuador in rose production. The cut-flower industry has always been notorious for exploiting its predominantly female labor force and the environment (Korovkin 2003; Korovkin and Sanmiguel-Valderrama 2007; Rodriguez and Silva 1988; Talcott 2004). However, some farms like Fairtrade-certified Nevado Roses, in southern Ecuador, pride themselves on their ethical and fair policies towards workers. My research fills a gap in the literature by contributing an ethnographic account of worker perspectives on Fairtrade rose production. I address the following questions: Who are the women working in Fairtrade flowers and what do they think about their jobs? How does women's work in flowers affect their efforts to manage daily life and the future? How are the experiences of workers in a Fairtrade flower farm different from reported experiences on uncertified farms or farms with other certifications? Following over fifty in-depth interviews, I show that Nevado women have better working conditions than workers on uncertified farms and more opportunity for participation in workplace policy than workers on farms with other ethical certification. Most said they enjoy their jobs. Yet the gendered challenges of balancing home and work highlight the inadequacy of employer and social support for reproductive labor, specifically childcare. In line with Bhavnani, Foran and Kurian (2003), I argue that women must be centered in all development of global society, and that masculinist conceptions of work do not offer women a chance to improve their whole lives.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (151 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f39w0cgc
ISBN:
9781303425370
Catalog System Number:
990040770300203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Corrie Ellis
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