Alexandria Digital Research Library

Non-suicidal self-injury among European-American and Latino/a-American inpatient adolescents

Author:
Sumalpong, Pilar
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Counseling, Clinical & School Psychology
Degree Supervisor:
Steven R. Smith
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2013
Issued Date:
2013
Topics:
Psychology, General, Psychology, Developmental, and Psychology, Clinical
Keywords:
Self-Injury
Self-harm
Ethnicity
Inpatient adolescent
Personality assessment
PAI-A.
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Psy.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2013
Description:

Although there has been an increase in research on non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) there continues to be a need to explore this phenomenon in light of evidence that this behavior is increasing rapidly among adolescent populations. Multiple formulations exist that have gained research support for the onset and maintenance of NSSI; impulsivity, addictive behavior, alexithymia and dissociative symptoms, maladaptive social/interpersonal relationships, personality pathology, and affect regulation. This study examined the affect regulation model proposed by Suyemoto (1998) in a sample (N = 175) of inpatient adolescents using an objective, self-report assessment instrument (PAI-A). This study also examined potential differences between European-American and Latino/a-American participants to test whether the affect regulation model is a useful cross-cultural explanation for NSSI within this sample. Mutivariate analysis revealed no group differences related to ethnicity but participants within the self-injuring group scored significantly lower on the PAI-A subscales that measure aggression with self-injurers scoring lower than their non-injuring counterparts on aggressive attitude, and physical aggression. Results suggest that adolescent inpatient self-injurers may attempt to regulate anger/hostility/aggression by employing self-harm as a maladaptive coping strategy. Results were consistent with previous research studies investigating functions of intentional self-harm.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (93 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3862dkp
ISBN:
9781303731938
Catalog System Number:
990041153490203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Pilar Sumalpong
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