Alexandria Digital Research Library

Spatial and temporal variation in biomass accumulation in southern California chaparral

Author:
Uyeda, Kellie Ann
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Geography
Degree Supervisor:
Douglas Stow
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2015
Issued Date:
2015
Topics:
Geography
Keywords:
Shrub
Fire
Fuel
Shrublands
Remote sensing
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2015
Description:

Wildfires are a common occurrence in chaparral shrublands, and post-fire patterns of biomass accumulation are important for understanding ecosystem productivity and fuel available for future fires. In this research, I examine patterns of biomass accumulation in southern California chaparral shrublands at early and late stages of post-fire recovery using a combination of detailed field work and remote sensing. Using field measurements of a site with adjacent stands of varying ages and high spatial resolution imagery, I examine patterns of species composition and associated levels of biomass to characterize long-term patterns in biomass accumulation. I also evaluate the potential for utilizing shrub growth ring widths to track annual biomass accumulation in the first decade of post-fire recovery, and test for the relationship between biomass and spatial variation in factors related to the energy and water balance. In addition, I examine the potential for extending the use of shrub growth rings to track biomass across larger spatial extents using satellite-based growth metrics. The study of stands of varying ages reveals that biomass shows substantial variation even within stands of the same age, and that species composition is different in younger stands of chaparral compared to the more mature stands. In the study of growth rings, I find that while measuring growth rings widths is a valuable method for tracking biomass accumulation in the first decade following a fire, there is no apparent relationship between biomass and factors related to the energy and water balance. Annual biomass growth, as estimated from shrub growth ring widths, shows a promising relationship with satellite-based metrics of annual growth, indicating the potential for further study of the relationship over larger spatial extents.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (116 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f38050tx
ISBN:
9781339218540
Catalog System Number:
990045866200203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Kellie Uyeda
File Description
Access: Public access
Uyeda_ucsb_0035D_12700.pdf pdf (Portable Document Format)