Alexandria Digital Research Library

An evaluation of English versus Spanish language choice during conversation training intervention for children with autism

Author:
Vaughn, Jamie Lee
Degree Supervisor:
George HS Singer
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2013
Issued Date:
2013
Topics:
Education, Special and Education, Bilingual and Multicultural
Keywords:
Autism
Bilingual
Communication
PRT
Spanish
Language
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Education
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2013
Description:

In children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, social communication deficits are identified as core developmental impairments. The ability to carry on a conversation through verbal exchanges poses challenges for individuals on the spectrum. The impact of exposure to a multilingual and multicultural environment on children with ASD is unknown and few empirical studies have investigated possible effects. Linguistically and culturally diverse families and settings are complex topics of discussion when addressing the instructional needs of children, including those with special needs. Controversy in bilingual language development theory has continued for decades, with few solid answers resulting from these efforts. The current study is a first step in the process of understanding what, if any, effects multilingual upbringings have on the conversational abilities of children with autism. A multielement (alternating treatments) design was implemented to compare whether children's expressive language output substantially differed when the interventionist spoke either English or Spanish during conversation training based on the methodology of Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT). Naturalistic interventions, such as PRT, are evidence-based in their effectiveness for improving a wide range of behavioral and socio-communicative skills for children with ASD and were utilized in the current study to maintain a natural home setting for the children. The data suggest no difference across a variety of dependent variable for expressive language for the child participants. Further directions for research and implications of these findings are discussed.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (88 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f37942sq
ISBN:
9781303732010
Catalog System Number:
990041153570203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Jamie Vaughn
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