Alexandria Digital Research Library

Social Movement Continuity and Abeyance: Feminist Mobilization on U.S. College Campuses

Author:
Crossley, Alison Dahl
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Sociology
Degree Supervisor:
Verta Taylor
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2013
Issued Date:
2013
Topics:
Gender Studies, Women's Studies, Education, Sociology of., and Sociology, General
Keywords:
Social movements
Sociology
Women's movements
Student movements
Feminism
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2013
Description:

Social movement abeyance theorizes the persistence of social movements during times that are antagonistic to mobilization. In this dissertation, I argue that U.S. feminism is currently in abeyance and that educational institutions are generative environments for abeyance structures. Drawing on theories of women's movements, student movements, and movements inside institutions, I provide a systematic updating of abeyance theory. The study's design is comparative: the three field sites are Smith College, the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities and the University of California-Santa Barbara, which are not only in three different regions of the U.S. but also have diverse student demographics and activist cultures. I employ both qualitative and quantitative methods and include semi-structured interviews (n=75), participant observation, and a survey of college students on each campus (n=1,400). I highlight three variable dimensions that help us understand the unique nature of social movements in abeyance: fields of contention, collective identity, and tactical repertoires. I argue that during periods in which mobilized participants have little support: a) institutions of higher education provide welcome environments for feminist mobilization, often in unexpected locations such as multi-cultural sororities and student government; b) feminist collective identities nest or "spill over" to influence other social movements including queer, anti-racist, and anti-fee hike organizations; and c) tactics move on-line, especially to social networking sites. The dissertation also attends to larger theoretical questions pertaining to emerging forms of political contestation and the persistence of social movements based on fundamental cleavages of gender, race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (249 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3736nws
ISBN:
9781303425141
Catalog System Number:
990040770210203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Alison Crossley
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