Alexandria Digital Research Library

Investigation of Self-Assembling Modules for RNA Architectonics

Author:
Calkins, Erin Rebecca
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Chemistry
Degree Supervisor:
Luc Jaeger
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2015
Issued Date:
2015
Topics:
Nanotechnology, Biochemistry, and Molecular biology
Keywords:
GNRA Tetraloop Receptor
Motif
Architectonics
Nanoengineering
RNA self-assembly
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2015
Description:

Natural RNA found in the ribosome, RNaseP, riboswitches and ribozymes has inspired the design and characterization of many synthetic RNA structures. These architectures are composed of building blocks that are comprised of RNA units that serve as modules (or motifs) for the construction of novel, structural and functional RNA molecules. To better understand the types of interactions involved in generating motifs, characterization of both the secondary and tertiary structure is essential. Large, complex RNA require many cooperative units folding in a programmable way, stabilizing the overall structure. The research presented herein, demonstrates the ability of RNA units to preserve their function despite drastic sequence variation, while still maintaining their overall shape or topology. We have identified several classes of GNRA tetraloop receptors (both natural and synthetic) that can be characterized by their phenotypic behavior toward GNRA tetraloops. Phenotypic behavior, as well as comparative analysis of known crystal structures can elucidate structural detail of unknown receptors. We have also identified additional folding constraints that can prove beneficial in structure prediction and architectonic design of large structured RNA's providing a basis for characterization and implementation of novel design principles, enhancing the complexity of synthetic RNA.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (251 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f34t6hwf
ISBN:
9781339471587
Catalog System Number:
990046179550203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Erin Calkins
File Description
Access: Public access
Calkins_ucsb_0035D_12713.pdf pdf (Portable Document Format)