Alexandria Digital Research Library

Patterning Surfaces using Block Copolymer Polymer Thin Films and Polymer Brushes Synthesized by a Light-Mediated Controlled Radical Polymerization Technique

Author:
Poelma, Justin Ernest
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Materials
Degree Supervisor:
Craig J. Hawker
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2014
Issued Date:
2014
Topics:
Chemistry, Polymer and Engineering, Materials Science
Keywords:
Polymer brushes
Functionalization
Patterning
Block copolymer
Surface
Light
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2014
Description:

Polymeric materials are ideal for modifying the properties of a wide range of surfaces due to their structural and chemical versatility. This dissertation describes the synthesis and utility of block copolymers and polymer brushes for patterning surfaces. The effect of a cyclic molecular architecture on feature size in phase separated block copolymer thin films is discussed, as well as the synthesis of acid-cleavable block copolymers for the fabrication of highly ordered nanoporous polymer thin films. In addition to polymers synthesized in solution for deposition onto surfaces, the synthesis of polymer brushes by surface-initiated polymerizations was also studied. A new light-mediated polymerization technique catalyzed by Ir(ppy)3 was employed as the surface-initiated polymerization technique. This polymerization is highly responsive to visible light and can be used to readily access patterns of polymer brushes. Using light as an external stimulus for brush growth or functionalization by a light-mediated atom transfer radical addition reaction, the molecular weight, architecture, grafting density, and chemical functionality of polymer brushes could be spatially controlled on surfaces. Finally, the synthesis of polymers by the Ir(ppy)3-catalyzed polymerization in solution was improved by utilizing a continuous flow reactor.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (266 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f3057d3g
ISBN:
9781321568424
Catalog System Number:
990045118780203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Justin Poelma
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